william steig drawing

June 20, 2011
Kartina Richardson

Ebert Presents: Who’s That Knocking At My Door

Discussing Martin Scorsese’s first feature film while standing in a kitchen.

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9 Comments

  1. Max Oblivion

    I’ve seen “Mean Streets” at least a couple of times and I saw “Boxcar Bertha” at a drive-in theater when I was 17. Somehow I managed to miss this early Scorsese film. I’d like to get a hold of it so I can see what sort of progression he made as a film maker between this one and “Streets”. I’d be interested to know how Kartina would compare the two films.

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  2. I really admire your work. You write the way I hope I one day I could, you see films the way I wish I could. I like how you focus on the emotions and the feelings that movies convey. For me, this is the most powerful impact film has had on my life – how it brings about memories and feelings – but I’ve always been scared of writing about films this way in fear that I would be dismissed as viewing the movie too…well…emotionally.

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  3. Well, you’ve got me again. In 1967, I was a not so young 38 year old in a skinny tie and dark suit. Still I really enjoyed this film. Maybe it was the Ray Barretto sequence, I’m not sure, but you unearthed some pleasant memories for me, yet again. I was fortunate enough to get to know Ray he was only six days older than me and a great, great musician. I appreciate your reviews so much, really!

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  4. I remember when you wrote about this in the early days of Mirror. I immediately added it to my Netflix queue and I’m so glad I did. It’s uneven but it’s so great to see Scorcese’s roots. You can see flashes of all of his later films in this one. And Harvey Keitel! He’s a baby in this film! It’s slightly disconcerting but in a good way. If that makes any sense.

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  5. I love your work Kartina. Your writing is exceptional and you have a remarkable insight in to film. I also really enjoy your short video reviews. Despite being a huge Scorsese fan I’ve overlooked this movie somehow. I can’t wait to check it out now.

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  6. Barry Egan

    I didn’t know where to write this so I chose here.
    I hope this is fine.

    uh, anyway.
    I like your reviews and writing.
    I was wondering if you’d review Avatar.

    Reply
  7. I don’t need to tell you that your analysis is wonderful, Ms. Richardson, do I?

    Something that I find is common in your reviews and that I think is what makes your analyses and reviews special, is the fact that you relate what we see in the dark room on the big screen to what we experience in the big world in real life. In your review, you mention that the only explanation why the boys are having fun in the party is that, because they are very sad and stressed, this energy comes out in the form of fun and laughter. The same exact thing happens in real life: the funniest people are usually the most people with troubles.

    Thanks, Ms. Richardson, for giving us something to enjoy. Waiting for your next review.

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  8. I love you, I do.

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  9. more more more

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